Jasmin Mara López

Jasmin Mara López is a journalist, audio producer and filmmaker based in New Orleans, Louisiana. Born in the US with Mexican roots, her childhood was affected by problems experienced on both sides of the Mexican border. This instilled in her a great passion for the empowerment of young people and social change.

Lopez will be guest-teaching "Entering the Film World and Funding your Projects" during Boreal Bash V.

Jasmin Mara López es periodista, productora de audio y cineasta radicada en Nueva Orleans, Louisiana. Nacida en los EEUU con raíces Mexicanas, su niñez fue afectada por problemas experimentados en ambos lados de la frontera de México. Esto inculcó en ella una gran pasión por el empoderamiento de los jóvenes y el cambio social.

Jasmin Mara Lopez, será parte del equipo de tutores durante el Boreal Bash V, se enfocara en entender como funciona el mundo del cine documental y el fondeo de los proyectos.

https://www.silentbeautyfilm.com/


Laurence Butet-Roch is a freelance photographer, writer, photo editor and educator. She was nine during the last Quebec referendum. As her parents, staunch separatists, explained the stakes, she imagined La Belle Province becoming an island. The celebratory bottle of champagne was never opened and Laurence began embracing English culture. Existing with a foot in two solitudes, as Hugh MacLennan once wrote, she began exploring the interplay between identity, place and politics. She has spent time with workers in Thetford Mines ahead of the closure of the last remaining Asbestos mine in the country, as well as with residents of Aamjiwnaang First Nation who live surrounded by the densest concentration of petrochemical plants in Canada, Ontario. In the same spirit, she’s also studying Quebec’s distinctive identity politics and surveying resistance movements in rural America.

Laurence holds a B.A. in International Relations from the University of British Columbia (2007), attended the School of Photographic Arts: Ottawa (2010) and completed a Master of Digital Media at Ryerson University (2016), thanks to an Ontario Graduate Scholarship. Her thesis focusing on combining Indigenous storytelling practices and experiential media, received the Ryerson Gold Medal and the Ryerson Board of Governors Award. 

Her work has been published in Polka MagazineThe New York Times Lens Blog, TIME Lightbox, The New Yorker Photo Booth, The British Journal of Photography, Raw View, and National Geographic, amongst others. 


Canadian-born but Mexico-based since 2014, Brett Gundlock is a freelance documentary photographer who divides his time between assignment work that has appeared in New York Times, Washington Post, Le Monde, TIME Magazine and personal projects.

Long-term work often sees Gundlock embedded with marginalized subcultures, striving to see, understand, and represent them with accuracy and dignity. As he embarks on year six of his project, “Carry the Blood, Emiliano,” he aims to witness the strength and resilience of remote communities in the Sierra Madre mountains who are caught in the crosshairs of Mexico’s ongoing drug crisis. The homesteaders comprise the most vulnerable rung in the drug trade ladder, and they must defend themselves from the violent cartels who try to appropriate their land. Documenting the conflict from the inside, Gundlock strives to access the perspectives of those engulfed in it and consumed by it.

Gundlock’s current work in Mexico exemplifies his career-long passions and commitments, valuing as it does the local, everyday heroism of citizens enmeshed in a global narratives of oppression, power, and greed.


Mauricio Palos is an independent documentarian and cultural promoter who  works mainly in North and South America. His work explores a variety of issues that deal with historical memory linked to political crises and land conflicts.  His first book My Perro Rano: Chronicles of Central America, was published in 2010 by Editorial RM. He is currently producing his second book La Ley del  Monte, an idea of ​​revolutionary Mexico from 1900 that investigates the power  of the land and its relationship with the rural, political and social worlds in Mexico.

Palos is the Director of the Centro Cultural Tenexcalco, a cultural center located on a rural area surrounded by common lands and private ranches in the Huasteca Potosina at his hometown at San Luis Potosí, its designed to bring and merge cultural activities on small rural communities.

His work has been published in Der SpiegelVolkskrantLufthansa MagazineCity Wire LondonGlamourColors MagazineThe Washington PostThe Wall Street Journal, Courier International, Bloomberg Busniesweek, Expansion Mexico, Gatopardo, Fusion, Roads and Kingdoms and Parts Unknown.


Ian Willms’ photography has explored relationships between migration, identity, culture and environment in Canada, The United States and Europe. His latest work follows the recent increase of asylum seekers migrating illegally from the U.S to Canada.

Ian has photographed his intimately personal experience of trauma and grief, after losing his father to a motorcycle accident. Other longterm projects include As Long as the Sun Shines, about the human and ecological impacts of Canada’s Oil Sands industry and Why We Walk, about the centuries-long pacifist legacy of the Russian Mennonites. These projects have been published by Time Magazine, The New York Times and The International New York Times and exhibited at the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego, Half King in New York, the CONTACT Photography Festival in Toronto and the Photoville festival in Brooklyn, respectively.

Based in Toronto, Ian is a founding member of Boreal Collective and is represented commercially by NAMARA. For a decade he has carried out freelance assignments globally, for some of the world’s finest editorial publications. Ian holds an Honours Diploma in Photojournalism and is an alumni of the Reportage by Getty Images Emerging Talent mentorship.

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